Monthly Archives for October 2009

Glycol Dehydrator – Indication of Reduced Glycol Circulation

The first oddity I noticed was the noise from the vents associated with the individual reboilers. As Figure 6-1 shows, the expanding gas, used to drive the glycol pumps is also used as fuel to reboil the glycol. The excess … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
Categories: Glycol Dehydration | Tags: | Leave a comment

Troubleshooting At The Dehydration & Compression Station

Natural gas transported through common carrier pipelines must meet a moisture specification of 7 pounds of water per MMscf. Gas is usually dried to meet this requirement by scrubbing with a concentrated glycol solution. Figure 6-1 shows a standard glycol … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Glycol Dehidrator Increase Gas Temperature

We invariably cool the compressor discharge prior to dehydration. Unfortunately, natural gas will be reheated—sometimes by 10°F — in a typical gas field dehydration contactor. This occurs because of two factors: • The circulating glycol may be 70° hotter than … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Excessive Gas Inlet Temperature

There are three factors which increase an air cooler’s inlet temperature: • The compressor valves are faulty. • The compression ratio has increased. • High pressure, high temperature natural gas is being produced from the wellhead. heat transfer surface area) … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Gas Side Problems

Whenever finned—tubed cooling bundles are arranged in parallel, as shown in figure 5-2, a potential exists for poor cooling due to gas maldistribution. A low gas outlet temperature from an individual bundle is indicative of lack of gas flow through … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Fan Blade Pitch

Air flow from a fan will vary considerably with the blade pitch. The pitch is adjustable. To save engine horsepower, an operator may set the blade pitch at 15° during the winter. During the summer, he may attempt to maximize … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Fan Tip Speed

Most fans are designed for a maximum fan tip speed of 14,000 feet per minute. To calculate the tip speed of the fan, do not calculate the fan rpm, from the pulley size and driver speed. The belts may be … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Insuffient Air Flow

If the air flow existing from the tube bundle is hotter than the effluent gas, the chances are there is insufficient air flow to properly cool the gas. In particular, if the air temperature blowing out of the effluent end … Continue reading

25. October 2009 by Jack
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Process Cooling – Gas Cooling

Underground gas transmission pipelines are externally wrapped in a protective plastic type coating. Gas temperatures in excess of 130°F to 140″F can cause embrittlement and eventual failure of this coating. For this reason, the usual industry practice is to specify … Continue reading

23. October 2009 by Jack
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FIELD TROUBLESHOOTING CHECKLIST FOR WELLHEAD COMPRESSORS

1. Check interstage line temperatures to determine which valves have been removed from a cylinder. 2. Remove disabled valves, cages, and valves in ends taken out of service and replace with gaskets. This reduces parasitic pressure loss. 3. By-pass crank-end … Continue reading

14. October 2009 by Jack
Categories: Wellhead Compression | Tags: | Leave a comment

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