Category: Physical Solvent Processes

Rectisol Process

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The German Lurgi Company and Linde A. G. developed the Rectisol® process to use methanol to sweeten natural gas. Due to the high vapor pressure of methanol this process is usually operated at temperatures of -30 to ~100°F. It has been applied to the purification of gas for LNG plants and in coal gasification plants, …

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Selexol Process

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Developed by Allied Chemical Company, this process is selective toward removing sulfur compounds. Levels of CO2 can be reduced by approximately 85%. This process may be used economically when there are high acid-gas partial pressures and the absence of heavy ends in the gas, but it will not normally meet pipeline gas requirements. This process …

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Sulfinol Process

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Licensed by Shell the Sulfinol® process combines the properties of a physical and a chemical solvent. The Sulfinol® solution consists of a mixture of sulfolane (tetrahydrothiophene 1-1 dioxide), which is a physical solvent, diisopropanolamine (DIPA), and water. DIPA is a chemical solvent that was discussed under the amines. The physical solvent sulfolane provides the system …

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Fluor Solvent Process

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This process uses propylene carbonate as a physical solvent to remove CO2 and H2S. Propylene carbonate also removes C2+ hydrocarbons, COS, SO2, CS2, and H2O from the natural gas stream. Thus, in one step the natural gas can be sweetened and dehydrated to pipeline quality. In general, this process is used for bulk removal of …

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Physical Solvent Processes

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These processes are based on the solubility of the H2S and/or CO2 within the solvent, instead of on chemical reactions between the acid gas and the solvent. Solubility depends first and foremost on partial pressure and secondarily on temperature. Higher acid-gas partial pressures and lower temperatures increase the solubility of H2S and CO2 in the …

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