Category Archives for Liquid Loading

Well Site – Soap Sticks

Equation 5 implies that the lower the density of the liquid accumulating in the tubing, the lower the entrainment velocity. This means that less gas flow is required to keep a well unloaded of liquids, when the liquid density is … Continue reading

04. October 2009 by Jack
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Well Site – Problem With Use Of Intermitters

The valve trim on the intermitter should be at least twice the diameter of the choke. When the intermitter valve opens it should not restrict gas flow from the well. Unfortunately, if the wellhead pressure builds to an excessive level, … Continue reading

04. October 2009 by Jack
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Well Site – Keeping Wells Unloaded

Mr. Howlaway eyed my equations suspiciously, “I can see that you have developed a method to predict the combination of the gas production rate and wellhead pressure necessary to keep my wells from loading -up with liquid. But suppose the … Continue reading

03. October 2009 by Jack
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Well Site – Sustaining Entrainment Velocity

When I first started troubleshooting partially depleted natural gas wells, I often wondered why so many of the hundred odd wells I visited were averaging 200-300 MSCFD. I had expected a more linear distribution between the minimum gas production per … Continue reading

03. October 2009 by Jack
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Well Site – Entrainment Velocity

A well that produces 100,000 SCFD of gas as a minimum, but periodically reaches a peak production rate of 300,000 SCFD once a day, is continuously loading and unloading liquids. The sequence of events are: • The velocity of gas … Continue reading

03. October 2009 by Jack
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Well Site – Liquid Loading

Although we have been talking about wellhead pressure (both shut-in and flowing tube), the wellhead pressure is just an indirect indication of the really important parameter-that is, the bottom hole pressure. It is the pressure inside the casing at the … Continue reading

03. October 2009 by Jack
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