Category: Treater Vessels Sizing

Example Sizing a Vertical Treater

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Given: Oil gravity = 40°API, 0.875 S.G. Oil flow rate = 2,000 bpd Inlet oil temperature = 90°F Water S.G. = 1.04 Inlet BS&W = 10% Outlet BS&W =1% Solution: 1. Settling Equation. Investigate treating at 90°F, 100°F, 120°F. 2. Retention Time. Plot computations of d and h with retention times less than 20 minutes. …

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Example Sizing a Horizontal Treater

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Given: Oil gravity = 30°API, 0.875 S.G. Oil flow rate = 5,000 bpd Inlet oil temperature = 80°F Water S.G. = 1.04 Inlet BS&W =10% Outlet BS&W =1% Solution: 1. Settling Equation. Investigate treating at 80°F, 100°F, 120°F. 2. Retention Time Equation. Plot computations of d and Leff with retention times less than 20 minutes. …

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Treaters Design Procedure

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In specifying the size of a treater, it is necessary to determine the  diameter (d), length or height of the coalescing section (Leff or h), and treating temperature or fire-tube rating. As we have seen, these variables are interdependent, and it is not possible to arrive at a unique solution for each. The design engineer …

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Treaters Water Droplet Size

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In order to develop a treater design procedure, the water droplet size to be used in the settling equation to achieve a given outlet water cut must be determined. As previously mentioned, it would be extremely rare to have laboratory data of the droplet size distribution for a given emulsion as it enters the coalescing …

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Treater Retention Time Equations

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The oil must be held at temperature for a specific period of time to enable de-emulsifying the water-in-oil emulsion. This information is best determined in the laboratory but, in the absence of such data, 20 to 30 minutes is a good starting point. Depending on the specific properties of the stream to be treated, geometry …

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Treater Settling Equations

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The specific gravity difference between the dispersed water droplets and the oil should result in the water “sinking” to the bottom of the treatment vessel. Since the oil continuous phase is flowing vertically upward in both vertical and horizontal treaters previously described, the downward velocity of the water droplet must be sufficient to overcome the …

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