Category: Mechanical Design of Pressure Vessels

Pressure Vessels – Vortex Breaker, Manways

{0 Comments}

Vortex Breaker As liquid flows out of the exit nozzle, it will swirl and create a vortex. Vortexing would carry the gas out with the liquid. Therefore, all liquid outlet nozzles should be equipped with a vortex breaker. Figure 12-9 shows several vortex breaker designs. Additional designs can be found in the Pressure Vessel Handbook. …

Read More…

Pressure Vessels – Nozzles

{0 Comments}

Nozzles should be sized according to pipe sizing criteria, such as those provided in API RP 14E. The outlet nozzle is generally the same size as the inlet nozzle. To prevent baffle destruction due to impingement, the entering fluid velocity is to be limited as: If an interior centrifugal (cyclone) separator is used, the inlet …

Read More…

Pressure Vessels – Shop Drawings

{0 Comments}

Before the vessel fabrication can proceed, the fabricator will develop complete drawings and have these drawings approved by the representative of the engineering firm and/or the operating company. These drawings are called shop drawings. They will show detailed vessel design and fabrication/welding, nozzle schedules and locations, details of vessel internals, and other accessories. Examples are …

Read More…

Pressure Vessels – Specifications

{0 Comments}

Most companies have a detailed general specification for the construction of pressure vessels, which defines the overall quality of fabrication required and addresses specific items such as: • Code compliance • Design conditions and materials • Design details • Vessel design and tolerances • Vessel connections (nozzle schedules) • Vessel internals • Ladders, cages, platforms, …

Read More…

Pressure Vessels – Determining Wall Thickness

{0 Comments}

The following formulas are used in the ASME Code Section VIII, Division 1 for determining wall thickness: Wall thickness—cylindrical shells Figure 12-1 defines the various types of heads. Most production facility vessels use ellipsoidal heads because they are readily available, normally less expensive, and take up less room than hemispherical heads. Cone-bottorn vertical vessels are …

Read More…