Tags: Condensate Stabilization

Trays

{0 Comments}

For most trays, liquid flows across an “active area” of the tray and then into a “downcomer” to the next tray below, etc. Inlet and/or outlet weirs control the liquid distribution across the tray. Vapor flows up the tower and passes through the tray active area, bubbling up through (and thus contacting) the liquid flowing …

Read More…

Sieve Trays

{0 Comments}

Sieve trays are the least expensive tray option. In sieve trays, vapor flowing up through the tower contacts the liquid by passing through small perforations in the tray floor (Figure 6-7b). Sieve trays rely on vapor velocity to exclude liquid from falling through the perforations in the tray floor. If the vapor velocity is much …

Read More…

Trays and Packing

{0 Comments}

The number of actual equilibrium stages determines the number of flashes that will occur. The more stages, the more complete the split, but the taller and more costly the tower. Most condensate stabilizers will normally contain approximately five theoretical stages. In a refluxed tower, the section above the feed is known as the rectification section, …

Read More…

Condensate Stabilizer Design

{0 Comments}

It can be seen from the previous description that the design of both a cold-feed stabilizer and a stabilizer with reflux is a rather complex and involved procedure. Distillation computer simulations are available that can be used to optimize the design of any stabilizer if the properties of the feed stream and desired vapor pressure …

Read More…

Distillation Tower with Reflux

{0 Comments}

Figure 6-5 shows a stabilizer with reflux. The well fluid is heated with the bottoms product and injected into the tower, below the top, where the temperature in the tower is equal to the temperature of the feed. This minimizes the amount of flashing. In the tower, the action is the same as in a …

Read More…

Cold Feed Distillation Tower

{0 Comments}

Figure 6-4 shows the cold feed distillation tower of Figure 6-3. The inlet stream enters the top of the tower. It is heated by the hot gases bubbling up through it as it falls from tray to tray through the downcomers. A flash occurs on each tray so that the liquid is in near-equilibrium with …

Read More…

Multistages Separation

{0 Comments}

Figure 6-1 shows a multistage separation process. By removing molecules of the light components in the first separator they are not available to flash to gas from the liquid in the second separator, and the partial pressure of intermediate components in the second separator is higher than it would have been if the first separator …

Read More…

Partial Pressure

{0 Comments}

The fraction of any one component that flashes to gas at any stage in a process is a function of the temperature, pressure, and composition of the fluid at that stage. For a given temperature this tendency to flash can be visualized by the partial pressure of the component in the gas phase that is …

Read More…