Tags: trays

High Capacity/High Efficiency Trays

{0 Comments}

High capacity/high efficiency trays have valves or sieve holes or both. They typically achieve higher efficiencies and capacities by taking advantage of the active area under the downcomer. At this time, each of the major vendors has its own version of these trays, and the designs are proprietary.

Read More…

Bubble Cap Trays

{0 Comments}

In bubble cap trays, vapor flowing up through the tower contacts the liquid by passing through bubble caps (Figure 6-7a). Each bubble cap assembly consists of a riser and a cap. The vapor rising through the column passes up through the riser in the tray floor and then is turned downward to bubble into the …

Read More…

Valve Trays

{0 Comments}

Valve trays are essentially modified sieve trays. Like sieve trays, holes are punched in the tray floor. However, these holes are much larger than those in sieve trays. Each of these holes is fitted with a device called a “valve.” Vapor flowing up through the tower contacts the liquid by passing through valves in the …

Read More…

Trays

{0 Comments}

For most trays, liquid flows across an “active area” of the tray and then into a “downcomer” to the next tray below, etc. Inlet and/or outlet weirs control the liquid distribution across the tray. Vapor flows up the tower and passes through the tray active area, bubbling up through (and thus contacting) the liquid flowing …

Read More…

Sieve Trays

{0 Comments}

Sieve trays are the least expensive tray option. In sieve trays, vapor flowing up through the tower contacts the liquid by passing through small perforations in the tray floor (Figure 6-7b). Sieve trays rely on vapor velocity to exclude liquid from falling through the perforations in the tray floor. If the vapor velocity is much …

Read More…